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Washington Post Article Investigates How Automakers Collect Vehicle Data

Using a 2017 Chevrolet, Washington Post technology columnist Geoffrey Fowler hacked his way into the vehicle’s data, discovering the vehicle had an internet connection that was always on, and also was collecting data from his smartphone.

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Washington Post technology columnist Geoffrey Fowler recently posted an article taking a closer look at exactly what information can be accessed from a vehicle. Using a 2017 Chevrolet, Fowler hacked his way into the vehicle’s data, discovering the vehicle had an internet connection that was always on, and also was collecting data from his smartphone.

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Fowler’s article in the Washington Post explains, as the “Your Car. Your Data. Your Choice.” campaign hopes to illuminate, that you, as a vehicle owner don’t own the data your car produces and collects. According to the article, 100 percent of the 2020 model year Fords, GMs and BMWs, as well as all but one model each from Toyota and VW, will come with built-in Internet connections, sending and receiving data from apps, insurance firms and elsewhere.

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