TV, Movies Elevate Popularity of the Custom Car - aftermarketNews

TV, Movies Elevate Popularity of the Custom Car

The black Honda Prelude with hints of pearl blue beckons you to take a ride to hear its 800-watt amplified stereo blasting OutKast's "Roses," to sit in its gray racing seats and watch through tinted windows as people stare enviously. Tricking out vehicles has long been a part of American culture. Whether it's a hot rod, monster truck or chromed-out Chevrolet, we want our rides to express our personalities. Today it's a $29-billion industry highlighted in movies and cable programs.

From Detroit Free Press

CHARLOTTE, NC — The black Honda Prelude with hints of pearl blue beckons you to take a ride to hear its 800-watt amplified stereo blasting OutKast’s “Roses,” to sit in its gray racing seats and watch through tinted windows as people stare enviously.

In front of Extreme Motor Trends in Fort Mill, S.C., the 1995 Prelude beckons you — especially if you’re a young man between 18 and 35 — to buy it or make your car look this cool.

Tricking out vehicles has long been a part of American culture. Whether it’s a hot rod, monster truck or chromed-out Chevrolet, we want our rides to express our personalities. Today it’s a $29-billion industry highlighted in movies and cable programs. The custom car culture is a reflection of our desire to try to be individuals, but still fit in.

We may live in cookie-cutter houses, but “Trading Spaces” teaches us how to make our wall paint and sofa match our personality. We may have the same Motorola cell phones, but dozens of ringer options and accessories personalize it. Every makeover TV show, whether it’s for our clothes or our bodies, emphasizes individuality.

“Kids today, they express who they are, whether they’re skateboarders, Goth or a jock,” said Karl Brown, 40, co-owner of Extreme Motor Trends.

The Prelude, with more than $12,000 worth of upgrades, is how Extreme Motor Trends expresses itself. At least 10,000 people paid $25 to see it and about 300 other cars in the Hot Import Nights car show at the Charlotte Merchandise Mart in June. Some of the most tricked-out domestic and import cars competed for cash prizes for the best lighting display, bodywork, audio and video systems and more. Hot Import Nights is one of the larger car shows held in the Charlotte area, but custom car culture is so big that there’s nearly one show a month within an hour’s drive during the summer.

“Charlotte and the surrounding areas seem to be hotbeds for this activity,” said Richard Goodwin, vice president of motor sports at California-based Vision Entertainment.

A custom car can be a hot rod, a hand-built car, a rebuilt Mustang, a Mazda RX-7 with speed-boosting nitrous oxide or a BMW with head-turning wheels.

The entertainment industry helps spread the culture. Video games such as “Gran Turismo” allow gamers to accessorize cars for looks and performance.

The movie “The Fast and the Furious” highlighted people who make Japanese compacts travel at warp speeds (tuner culture).

In the music videos of the late ’80s and early ’90s, West Coast rappers drove low riders and cars with hydraulics popularized by some Hispanics. Today, eye-popping Mercedeses and Bentleys have replaced bouncing Chevrolets and Cadillacs.

The early years of MTV’s “Cribs” gave viewers a taste of what Snoop Dogg, Ludacris and Shaq really drive. Showing celebrities’ garages became so popular the network created “Whips, Rides & Dubs.” Today, the Learning Channel and Spike TV have shows about tricked-out rides. The latest is the Learning Channel’s “Overhaulin,’ ” in which a person’s car is given a surprise makeover. Think “While You Were Out” for your car.

_______________________________________

Click here to view the rest of today’s headlines.

You May Also Like

Epicor Unveils Digital Cataloging, Future Plans

The new catalogs use Epicor-validated, ACES-compliant data and an “Intelligent Search” feature to find the right part quickly.

Epicor digital catalog

Epicor introduced two cloud-based versions of its digital cataloging tool-- Epicor Catalog for Automotive-- at the 2023 AAPEX Show that will be available for parts distributors and service/'repair dealers in the US and Canada come February.

The new, standalone catalogs include Epicor-validated, ACES-compliant data and a new “Intelligent Search” feature that enables users to quickly find the right parts for virtually any vehicle repair, the company said. In addition, all part and application content in the catalog for its Mexico customers is in Spanish, enabling users to save time and eliminate lookup errors.

Epicor Launches Automotive B2B eCommerce Platform

The Epicor Commerce for Automotive platform features multi-seller support and parts lookups for distributors and their customers.

Epicor commerce for Automotive
Marelli Launches Fuel System for Hydrogen Propulsion Systems

Marelli will present a variety of new technology at the CTI Symposium in Germany, Dec. 5-6.

The Automotive Aftermarket’s Role in a Circular Economy 

Take a deep dive into the factors driving the automotive aftermarket toward a more circular economy.

Circular economy
AI in the Aftermarket: Endless Applications Yet Hurdles Remain

The automotive aftermarket is delving into AI and ways it can help businesses be more productive and effective.

Other Posts

Intellias to Showcase HMI, ADAS and More at CES 2024

The company also will unveil the next generation of its IntelliKit, a portable fully-integrated digital cockpit.

Anyline Partners with Treads to Simplify Car Ownership

Anyline has partnered with Treads, an AI-driven car management subscription service, to enhance analytics for car owners.

Anyline Trends partnership
Unifying Your Parts Technology to Eliminate Channel Conflict

Harmonizing various channels in your eCommerce strategy through unified technology helps build an agile business model.

ecommerce channel conflict auto parts suppliers
Opus IVS Achieves 100+ Patents Pending

The company will demonstrate its patented technologies at the 2023 SEMA Show.