R.L. Polk & Co.'s Ask the Industry Looks at Business Cycle Changes - aftermarketNews

R.L. Polk & Co.’s Ask the Industry Looks at Business Cycle Changes

For a variety of reasons, Fall tends to be a busy time for aftermarket companies as they prepare for upcoming trade shows, meetings and the 2008 selling season. This week's Ask the Industry asks a variety of aftermarket professionals if Fall is their busy time of year and if their business cycle changes throughout the year.

by Brian Cruickshank

For a variety of reasons, Fall tends to be a busy time for aftermarket companies as they prepare for upcoming trade shows, meetings and the 2008 selling season. This week’s Ask the Industry asks a variety of aftermarket professionals if Fall is their busy time of year and if their business cycle changes throughout the year.

Bill Thompson from IMR Research said, "Because of what we do — provide data and support to manufacturers — it’s a little different for us, as compared to a manufacturer. Once AAPEX hits, things slow down for us for about six weeks. We used to get a longer breather, but business has picked up and we tend to be busy throughout the year."

"Our busy time is January through May," said Tom Marx of the Marx Group. Marx said that the early part of the year is busiest primarily because clients tend to procrastinate over their next-year budgets and planning. In other words, the 2007 plan is often worked on in early 2007, rather than late 2006. "Our second busiest time of year is just after AAPEX until around mid-December. During that time, we’re planning for the following year. This year has been a sort of aberration for us and we’ve been incredibly busy throughout the summer since clients have decided to invest in Fall marketing."

According to Dayco’s Stacy Griggs, summer is the busiest time as it’s the manufacturer’s busy selling season. "There is lots of vacation travel, plus the heat is good for parts sales," said Griggs. "In the Fall, we prepare for Industry Week, like everyone else, but I’m not sure the Fall is any busier than any other time of year."

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